Session descriptions will be added as they are received by presenters.

KEYNOTES

A Promise to Keep: Developing Lifelong Readers

     Julie Washington, Ph.D., Professor, Georgia State University
When most children enter school they are excited and eager to learn to read. Educators recognize reading as one of the most important skills that students will attain during early schooling. Yet a significant number of children nationwide struggle with reading and fail to develop proficient, grade level reading skills by third grade. What are we doing for these children? How are we reaching them? Why aren’t we reaching all of them? This presentation will focus on the promise of literacy instruction, attainment, and intervention, and the role of key stakeholders in promoting literacy success for all of our children.
Competency:     Research
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     At-Risk Students
    Identification and Assessment

The Spirit, The Way, The Gift: A Transformational Journey

     Mary Ann Whiteker, Superintendent, Hudson ISD
Hear how as Superintendent of Schools, Mary Ann decided to stop and listen to herself as an instructional leader, instead of focusing on summative test results. It was clear that her students needed teachers who were prepared to teach reading right the first time. Hear her story of transforming first instruction and dramatically shrinking Tier 2 and Tier 3 intervention.
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     At-Risk Students
    Identification and Assessment
    School Transformation

Sessions

Academic Language Development-Based Innovations for Students Underserved in Literacy

     Beulah Johnson-Keels, Ed.D., SPEECH EFX
     Robert Meyer, Publisher, Ventris Learning
Today's ELA/Literacy standards require a command of Academic Classroom English (ACE) in reading, writing, speaking, and listening, resulting in high expectations for every student. However, many educators (and the public) view students who live in poverty and/or are Standard English Learners (SEL) (who speak varieties of English that differ significantly from ACE) through a deeply ingrained deficit perspective, with lowered expectations. Educators tend to equate home language varieties with poor grammar, and rely on ineffective correctionist strategies. They lack the linguistic know-how and resources necessary to help SEL's master the conventions of ACE. In this session, attendees will learn about strength-based language development supports that enable every student to succeed in early literacy regardless of his or her level of school readiness, or home language.          
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     Oral Language and Speech

Achieving Dynamic Reading Sustainability: Molding Young Minds from a Turn Around Principal's Perspective

     Siomara Saenz-Phillips, Principal, Jefferson Elementary School Houston ISD
     Novella Washington, Ph.D., Coaching Coordinator, Neuhaus Education Center
This presentation provides strategies from a principal's perspective when it comes to moving the needle where reading success is concerned for ELL students.
Audience:     Leadership
Track:     At-Risk Students
    English Language Learner
    Family Engagement
    School Transformation

Confused about Dyslexia? A Scientific Perspective

     Jack M. Fletcher, Ph.D., Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Distinguished Professor,
           University of Houston
In the past year, there has been a concerted effort to highlight dyslexia as a specific learning disability, with attempts to introduce special provisions in legislation at state and national levels. This has prompted a response from the International Literacy Association questioning whether dyslexia is a special form of reading problem and whether there are characteristics and interventions specific for dyslexia. This presentation will provide a scientific view of dyslexia as a well-understood form of learning disability with specific reading, cognitive, neural, and genetic characteristics. However, the attributes of dyslexia are dimensional, not categorical. Therefore, precise estimates of prevalence are difficult to justify. It is difficult to differentiate children with dyslexia from children with word reading and spelling difficulties who may be lower in intelligence, have comorbid problems with math or ADHD on reading and neural characteristics, and there is little evidence of dyslexia-specific interventions, although explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle as early in schooling as possible is essential for any student with problems acquiring word reading and spelling skills. Like other learning disabilities, dyslexia is real, interferes with adaptation, and has prominent neurobiological correlates. But the neural systems are malleable and many students can overcome dyslexia with early intervention. Intractability to instruction makes dyslexia unexpected, not a cognitive discrepancy.
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     At-Risk Students
    Critical Reading Skills
    Federal, State and Local Legislation
    Identification and Assessment

Campus Risk Loads...A Better Definition of Poverty

     Carla J. Stevens, Assistant Superintendent, Research & Accountability, Houston ISD
School leaders are challenged to think and act differently to address the effect of income inequality on academic performance. Many schools in urban centers are located in high-poverty areas, making it important to understand which may need the most help and what kind of help would be most useful. However, simple proxies for poverty, like eligibility for free and reduced priced meals, fail to capture the volume and nature of the challenges that schools face. Inspired by the 2014 report, A Better Picture of Poverty, HISD identified school and neighborhood risk factors that contribute to chronic absenteeism and low performance.
Audience:     Leadership
Track:     At-Risk Students

Disruptive Innovation: Transforming Adolescent Literacy

     Barbara Conway, Ph.D., Vice President of Innovative Solutions, Neuhaus Education Center
     Catherine Scott, M.Ed., CALT, Reading Specialist, Neuhaus Education Center
     Carole Hyde, Hardin-Jefferson ISD Dyslexia Therapist and Coordinator
Teachers of students in Grades 4-12 will be presented with information about basic literacy skills using longer words. Neuhaus Academy, an online resource for students in older grades who struggle with reading, spelling, and vocabulary will be presented.
IDA Standards:     Knowledge of the Structure of Language
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     At-Risk Students

Dyslexia 101

     Megan Murphy, M.Ed., MRT, CALT, Coordinator of State Partnerships, Neuhaus
        Education Center

The purpose of the Dyslexia 101 presentation is to help teachers, administrators, parents, and adult literacy providers understand how and why some people struggle with learning to read, which of these people might be considered dyslexic, and what kind of reading instruction is essential to their learning. The IDA definition of dyslexia is the foundation of the presentation, as well as other research. There is also an overview of the legislation pertaining to dyslexia.
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     Dyslexia

Dyslexia and Dysgraphia: Addressing Written Expression, Mechanics, and Composition

     Cena Holifield, Ph.D., CALT-QI, Director, The 3-D School & Professor, William Carey
         University
Dr. Holifield will present information that includes recent studies of brain differences between students with dyslexia and dysgraphia. The session will provide evidence-based information for the intervention of written expression that supports students with both dyslexia and dysgraphia.
IDA Standards:      Knowledge of the Structure of Language
    Knowledge of Dyslexia and Other Learning Disorders
    Structured Langauge Teaching: Handwriting, Spelling, Written Expression 
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists
Track:     At-Risk Students
    Oral Language and Speech
    Spelling and Vocabulary

Dyslexia - Teaching Strategies and Accomodations

      Rebecca Tolson, Director of Professional Development, Neuhaus Education Center
This session focuses on the teaching strategies and accommodations for dyslexia that are standardized by the International Dyslexia Association. The presenter demonstrates multisensory structured language techniques based on the Structured Literacy philosophy in the areas of reading, spelling and writing. This interactive session demonstrates ways to meet the challenges of teaching students with dyslexia to assure coverage of essential components for student progress.
Audience:     Teachers
Track:     Executive Function
    Dyslexia

Faculty Favorite Word Learning Strategies

     Elisa Barnes, M.Ed., CALT-QI, Instructional Manager, Neuhaus Education Center
    Jeremy Creed, M.Ed., Instructor, Neuhaus Education Center
Comprehension is the reason for reading and vocabulary knowledge is vital to comprehension. If the reader understands most of the words on a page, he or she will have a good understanding of the meaning of the text. The deeper the reader's vocabulary the deeper his or her comprehension will. In this session, Neuhaus faculty will share some of their favorite word learning strategies that provide students with opportunities to learn new vocabulary on their own.
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists
Track:     Critical Reading Skills
    Spelling and Vocabulary

Formative Assessment as Progress Monitoring

     Kristi L. Santi, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of Houston
     Jacqueline Hawkins, Ed.D., Associate Professor, University of Houston
This session will help educational professionals understand the value of formative assessment as a tool to increase academic learning in the classroom. Discussion points will include a definition, research to support the use of this type of assessment, and practical applications for immediate use.
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     Identification and Assessment

It's More Than Compliance: Going Above and Beyond

     Sara Arispe, Associate Superintendent, Fort Worth ISD
     Kevin A. Grevemberg, Coordinator of Literacy Special Projects, Neuhaus Education Center
This session will present Fort Worth ISD's revamp of their dyslexia program. The district voted to train 60 dyslexia teachers in a comprehensive program which meets all criteria set forth in the Texas Dyslexia Handbook and the International Dyslexia Association Knowledge and Practice Standards for Teachers of Reading. Teachers completing all trainings and associated practica will be able to sit for the Center for Effective Reading Instruction national exam at TIER III, Level I.
Audience:     Leadership
Track:     Executive Function

Leading a Literacy Culture

     Julie Fernandez, Ed.D., Assistant Professor, Houston Baptist University
It is essential that school leaders are committed to creating school cultures that model research-based literacy practices across all curriculums. This session will explore how a leader can influence, plan, and sustain a literacy culture that is focused on improving literacy abilities for all students.
Audience:     Leadership
Track:     Accommodations and School Support Services
    Executive Function
    School Transformation

Lufkin ISD Literacy Initiative

     Alys Ray, District Dyslexia Coordinator,  Lufkin ISD
    Julie Madden, District Literacy Specialist,  Lufkin ISD
     Kathy Thannisch, District Early Childhood Specialist,  Lufkin ISD
Lufkin ISD will share their success with training dyslexia therapists on each district campus and their role in literacy leadership. They will discuss show their knowledge and abilities has led to implementation of enhanced intervention planning. Learn how they implemented Reading Readiness in Kindergarten, Language Enrichment in grades 1-2, and Developing Metacognitive Strategies in grades 3-5.
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     School Transformation

Multiple Certification for Multiple Systems of Support

     Suzanne Carreker, Ph.D., CALT-QI, Secretary, The International Dyslexia Association
    Lauren Topek, Ed.D, Chief of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment, Spring ISD - Gordon M.
    Anderson Leadership Center
   Tracy Weeden, Ed.D., President, Neuhaus Education Center
The International Dyslexia Association and the Center for Effective Reading Instruction are collaborating to ensure that teachers know how to teacher all students to read well. The IDA Knowledge and Practice Standards are the foundation for this collaboration. The Certification Exam for Educators of Reading has been developed based on these standards and in accordance with best practices in the field of credentialing. Between the two organizations, multiple tiers of teacher certification will be offered to provide students the precise instruction they need. The exam and certifications will help parents find a highly knowledgeable and skilled dyslexia specialist to help their child who is struggling to read and will aid in hiring and verifying highly knowledgeable and skilled teachers to meet student needs.
IDA Standards:     Knowledge of the Structure of Language
    Knowledge of Dyslexia and Other Learning Disorders
    Interpretation and Administration of Assessments for Planning Instruction
Audience:     Leadership
Track:     At-Risk Students

SOS...Tips to Help Students Overcome Stress

     Michelle Beard, PH.D.
In today’s world, students are faced with more high stakes testing scenarios and application processes than ever before. Not surprisingly, anxiety disorders represent one of the most prevalent problems in our society today. Learn about underlying mechanisms for stress and worry, tips to minimize stress in the classroom and on tests, and how to know when students may need professional help.
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists
Track:     Social-emotional, Anxiety, Depression

Special Education or 504: What is Needed for Students Diagnosed with Dyslexia to Ensure Academic Success

      Regina Boulware-Gooden, Vice President of School Transformation and Research, Neuhaus
     Education Center Kevin A. Grevemberg, Coordinator of Literacy Special Projects, Neuhaus
    Education Center
Currently there is intense discussion about funding for special education taking place in the state of Texas. Funding is a crucial issue that must be addressed so that children receive the services they need. Yet, it is important to ensure there is a strategic use of current funds grounded in research and best practice to move the needle for children with learning differences. What are the steps you need to take to ensure your district data provides evidence that special education is working in your district?
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists
Track:     School Transformation, At-Risk Students

A Structured Literacy Initiative - 20 Years and Counting

     Elsa Cardenas-Hagan, Ed.D., Director, Valley Speech Language and Learning Center
     Benilda Cervantes, M.A., Curriculum Specialist, Brownsville ISD
Learn how Brownsville READS! engaged the Neuhaus Education Center to begin an educator initiative with Brownsville ISD in 1997. Results indicate that all K-3 teachers and their coaches understood and successfully implement structured literacy. The reading initiative included mentorship, follow-up sessions, a plan to scale-up.  Learn about the plan, the lessons learned regarding sustainability, and the steps necessary for its future success.
 
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     School Transformation

Sustainable Systems of Support Panel Discussion

     Khechara Bradford, Asst. Superintendent for Curriculum & Instruction, Fort Worth ISD
     Lupita Hinojosa, Ed.D., Chief Academic Officer, Spring ISD
    Lisa Jeffrey, Director of Curriculum & Instruction Hudson ISD
    Lance Menster, Officer of Elementary Curriculum and Development, Houston ISD
    Tracy Weeden, Ed.D., President & CEO, Neuhaus Education Center
In this session, central office leaders will share best and next practices when it comes to instituting sustainable systems of support so that literacy is a reality for all students. Learn from their triumphs and challenges on scaling literacy best practices to move the needle at tier 1, as well as create accelerated growth for students at tier 2 and tier 3.
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     School Transformation

We Keep Our Promises: Effective Reading Instruction with High-Risk Students

     Julie Washington, Ph.D., Professor, Georgia State University
Many children will struggle with developing proficient reading skills. The children who are at greatest risk for struggling, and failure, are children from low-income and minority communities. This presentation will focus on the unique trajectory and needs of these high-risk groups, including specific skill areas and strategies that are critical for developing successful, lifelong readers.
Audience:     Teachers, Reading Specialists, Leadership
Track:     At-Risk Students
    Critical Reading Skills
    Oral Language and Speech

Neuhaus Education Center   |   4433 Bissonnet   |   Bellaire, Texas 77401
Tel: 713.664.7676   |   Fax: 713.664.4744   |   About   |   Contact   |   Privacy   |   RSS
Schipul Web Design   |  Tendenci® Membership Management Software   |  Site Map

Board Login

Neuhaus Education Center is a
501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

facebook-icon.png  TWITTER-ICON.PNG  youtube-icon.png  flickr-icon.png